Long-Term Thinking

Last week, I authored an article for MarketWatch on my interpretation of Jeff Bezos’s planned space flight. Typically I wouldn’t opine on this man’s, or really anyone else’s, motives for his actions, but I was invited to do so and obliged (hard to decline an invite from MarketWatch). In the article, I share a few insights into Jeff’s extraordinary, for many of us even unrelatable, ability to set a long-term vision for ourselves and our businesses, often against not only conventional wisdom, but even current science and human capability.

Jeff is an inventor in the most classic sense. An iconoclast. A visionary with audacious ambition and a force of nature that knows few, if any, bounds. For the record, I do not know Jeff Bezos. I’ve never met or interviewed him and likely won’t, but I can certainly draw some conclusions about his personality and motivations from Brad Stone’s meticulously researched book, Amazon Unbound, the feature of this week’s On Leadership podcast interview.

You can read my recent MarketWatch article here. I think some insights in it might impact your leadership and visioning skills and even grant you some permission (which you don’t need from me) to think bigger. In perhaps every area of your life.


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About the Author

Scott Miller

Scott Miller is a 25-year associate of FranklinCovey and serves as Senior Advisor, Thought Leadership. Scott hosts the world’s largest and fastest-growing podcast/newsletter devoted to leadership development, On Leadership. Additionally, Scott is the author of the multi-week Amazon #1 New Release, Management Mess to Leadership Success: 30 Challenges to Become the Leader You Would Follow, and the Wall Street Journal bestseller, Everyone Deserves a Great Manager: The 6 Critical Practices for Leading a Team. Previously, Scott worked for the Disney Development Company and grew up in Central Florida. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, with his wife and three sons.

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